5 Books on my TBR since the Dawn of Time

Top Ten Tuesday is hosted by The Broke and the Bookish. They are great at bringing new top ten themes, and they have a huge list of them well in advance for those bloggers that like to plan super far ahead. You can learn about joining in here. I usually make a list of five instead of ten, just for your knowledge 

This week is a sort of different TBR list for Top Ten Tuesday, as I’ll be listing off books I had on my TBR since before I even started book blogging, and STILL haven’t gotten around to. I haven’t officially been book blogging for a year yet, but I did have some things I kept meaning to read. These books, probably because I’ve been meaning to read them for so long, I feel the least amount of urgency about. If I never read them I don’t think I would be sad… except maybe for The Night Circus

The Virgin Suicides by Jeffrey Eugenides

The Virgin Suicides by Jeffrey EugenidesThe haunting, humorous and tender story of the brief lives of the five entrancing Lisbon sisters, The Virgin Suicides, now a major film, is Jeffrey Eugenides’s classic debut novel.

The shocking thing about the girls was how nearly normal they seemed when their mother let them out for the one and only date of their lives. Twenty years on, their enigmatic personalities are embalmed in the memories of the boys who worshipped them and who now recall their shared adolescence: the brassiere draped over a crucifix belonging to the promiscuous Lux; the sisters’ breathtaking appearance on the night of the dance; and the sultry, sleepy street across which they watched a family disintegrate and fragile lives disappear.

Why I Haven’t Read It Yet: There was a period of time when Chapters had all these classics with minimalist covers in bright colours. And I got it into my head that I would buy and collect these. I started with one to see if I would read it. Three moves and almost four years later and I still haven’t. This is a case where I watched the movie first and I think that’s what’s hindered me in reading it.

City of Fallen Angels by Cassandra Clare and rest of The Mortal Instruments Series (the rest of it aka books 4 – 6)

City of Fallen Angels by Cassandra ClareThe Mortal War is over, and sixteen-year-old Clary Fray is back home in New York, excited about all the possibilities before her. She’s training to become a Shadowhunter and to use her unique power. Her mother is getting married to the love of her life. Downworlders and Shadowhunters are at peace at last. And—most importantly of all—she can finally call Jace her boyfriend.

But nothing comes without a price.

Someone is murdering Shadowhunters, provoking tensions between Downworlders and Shadowhunters that could lead to a second, bloody war. Clary’s best friend, Simon, can’t help her—his mother just found out that he’s a vampire, and now he’s homeless. When Jace begins to pull away from her without explaining why, Clary is forced to delve into the heart of a mystery whose solution reveals her worst nightmare: she herself has set in motion a terrible chain of events that could lead to her losing everything she loves. Even Jace.

Why I Haven’t Read It Yet: I thought this was a trilogy. The third book didn’t really seem like an end, but I left it alone. Then the rest of the books started coming out. I bought City of Fallen Angels and later ended up selling it because I clearly wasn’t reading it. Part of me thinks I might get to this someday, but if not, meh.

Fall on Your Knees by Ann-Marie MacDonald

Fall on Your Knees by Ann-Marie MacDonaldFollowing the curves of history in the first half of the twentieth century, Fall On Your Knees takes us from haunted Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, through the battle fields of World War One, to the emerging jazz scene of New York city and into the lives of four unforgettable sisters. The mythically charged Piper family–James, a father of intelligence and immense ambition, Materia, his Lebanese child-bride, and their daughters: Kathleen, a budding opera Diva; Frances, the incorrigible liar and hell-bent bad girl; Mercedes, obsessive Catholic and protector of the flock; and Lily, the adored invalid who takes us on a quest for truth and redemption–is supported by a richly textured cast of characters. Together they weave a tale of inescapable family bonds, of terrible secrets, of miracles, racial strife, attempted murder, birth and death, and forbidden love. Moving and finely written, Fall On Your Knees is by turns dark and hilariously funny, a story–and a world–that resonate long after the last page is turned.

Why I Haven’t Read It Yet: I don’t read a lot of books clearly set in Canada, and some may remember, and so I do want to read this. In high school, a girl I knew did her final year essay on it and I always admired the cover from afar. I feel like I owe it to the author, as a fellow Canadian, to get to this book.

The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern

The Night Circus by Erin MorgensternThe circus arrives without warning. No announcements precede it. It is simply there, when yesterday it was not. Within the black-and-white striped canvas tents is an utterly unique experience full of breathtaking amazements. It is called Le Cirque des Rêves, and it is only open at night.

But behind the scenes, a fierce competition is underway: a duel between two young magicians, Celia and Marco, who have been trained since childhood expressly for this purpose by their mercurial instructors. Unbeknownst to them both, this is a game in which only one can be left standing. Despite the high stakes, Celia and Marco soon tumble headfirst into love, setting off a domino effect of dangerous consequences, and leaving the lives of everyone, from the performers to the patrons, hanging in the balance.

Why I Haven’t Read It Yet: People are forever talking about how amazing this book is, so it’s hard to even think of not reading it. This is perhaps the only book on the list that I have real hope of reading someday.

The City of Ember by Jeanne DuPrau

The City of Ember by Jeanne DuPrauMany hundreds of years ago, the city of Ember was created by the Builders to contain everything needed for human survival. It worked…but now the storerooms are almost out of food, crops are blighted, corruption is spreading through the city and worst of all—the lights are failing. Soon Ember could be engulfed by darkness…

But when two children, Lina and Doon, discover fragments of an ancient parchment, they begin to wonder if there could be a way out of Ember. Can they decipher the words from long ago and find a new future for everyone? Will the people of Ember listen to them?

Why I Haven’t Read It Yet: I kept seeing this cover around over and over until it got into my head. I only now read a summary to see what it was about. But I have been meaning to pick this up for years.

What is a book you feel like you’ve had on your TBR literally forever?