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The Girl in 6E | Book Review | Lunch-Time LibrarianSynopsis.

I haven’t touched a human in three years. That seems like it would be a difficult task, but it’s not. Not anymore, thanks to the internet.

I am, quite possibly, the most popular recluse ever. Not many shut-ins have a 200-member fan club, a bank account in the seven-figure range, and hundreds of men lining up to pay for undivided attention.

They get satisfaction, I get a distraction. Their secret desires are nothing compared to why I hide… my lust for blood, my love of death.

Taking their money is easy. Keeping all these secrets… one is bound to escape.

What if you hid yourself away because all you could think of was killing? And what if one girl’s life depending on you venturing into society?

Enter a world of lies, thrills, fears, and all desires, in this original thriller from A. R. Torre.

The Good Bits.

The concept for The Girl in 6E is one I’ve never heard before and it immediately sounded really cool. I wanted to know why Deanna was locked up and what was driving her to kill. I think that the concept is mostly what’s driving this novel forward. The conflict isn’t fully believable, and the writing could be better, but the story will keep you moving through the pages and wanting to read the other books in the series.

Deanna’s career is as a cam model, and so in the beginning of some of the chapters a particular sexual fetish is named and defined. What follows is a scene with Deanna working with a client that has the fetish, her reactions to it, and some of the client’s personality. I knew what camming was before I read the book, but I wasn’t familiar with all the details of it. I found that these were the best details and you got to see a lot of Deanna’s character from these interactions.

I can’t say that I’ve ever read an erotic thriller before, so I suspected that it would be 95% thriller and any erotic bits would just be mentions of Deanna’s camming. But really, the erotic makes up at least 50% of the novel. This being said I did enjoy all the parts that came up. They weren’t just pushed in unnecessarily, and they weren’t crude for the sake of it. When it was necessary to be crude it was (like when she was camming with clients), it was. And when the scene required more romance that was done well too.

Sour Grapes.

As a personal preference, I do not like to see the villain’s POV. I find that it ruins a lot of the mystery and suspense, but I understand that it’s needed in cases where the villain isn’t as present. In this case, Deanna spends most of her time alone in her apartment, so without an alternative POV, we would never see the villain. But if reading about a pedophile from the perspective of one is something that would upset you, you may want to skip over those bits. In addition to that, most of the POVs felt unnecessary. It was common for me to just skip over until we got back to Deanna.

There’s also a lot of telling in this book. It’s first person from Deanna’s POV (all other POVs are third person) and she spends most of her time alone, so it’s a lot of inner monologues. It’s a lot of her explaining her past, her fantasies, her history with clients, etc. etc. I didn’t mind this much because, for the most part, it was all interesting stuff. But I know that this might drive other readers crazy.

The Last Bite.

When reading this novel, things popped up that irked me, I didn’t quite get Deanna’s motivations, and the relationship felt kind of instalove, but I felt compelled to keep reading at the end. The Girl in 6E draws you in with the suspense and wondering what’s going to come next. I’ll be reading through this series for the next couple weeks so keeping coming back every Sunday to see the instalments!

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How do you feel about multiple POVs within a book? Hate it, or love it?

Have you read The Girl in 6E, what did you think?

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